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Welcome to Ashcroft-NOLAC Airfield 13 Aug 2014 Click on RED

Pilots who are not involved with the Lancashire Aero Club please click Here
   
Ashcroft  Airfield Newsletter ... Here  
           

1. Lancashire Aero Club (banned from Ashcroft until 2050 AD)

... Legal proceedings re: LAC gate damage to Ashcroft property now re-established
    
... Ashcroft working at a 'high level' with other disgruntled parties to ensure fair play

 
... Ashcroft establishing total digital vocal & video recording of LAC for legal reasons
  

First warning ............................. 26 July 2014

Second warning to be sent ....... 15 Aug 2014
Deadline for payment ............... 15 Oct 2014
 



2. Current Issues ... Public Safety
  
We welcome the CAA's new policy to ... "Develop and adopt an evidence and risk-based approach proportionate to the risk-appetite of participants while ensuring protection for uninformed third parties;" 
 
Independent assessment of public safety standards iaw a Circuit Judge comments required.
  


  Common Sense and Best Practice approach to .... public safety
 
Plan to fly at 50ft above our Public Road to give adequate clearance to vehicles that are hidden from a high hedge when landing on RW27. Planning to fly over the road at 20ft is unacceptable and a breach of ANO Rule 5(3)a "Failure of a Power Unit"
 


After a High Court Judge recognises Ashcroft's concerns re: LAC low flying over public highways, commenting ...it "cries out" for a proper Expert assessment, Ashcroft responds by constructing a central HD quad-video device to protect our General Public (this is in addition to the 2 cameras that  'caught'  the LAC flying over our road at 19ft 4 in)
  
These devices are affectionately referred to by Ashcroft (& the environs) as LAC Busters

... If the LAC continue to endanger our Public, we will contact our Member of Parliament



    
3.  Large Aeroplanes (>5,700kg) / Private Aircraft 
  
All pilots wishing to use Ashcroft Airfield should attempt to conform with the principles of "common-sense aircraft performance planning and normal airmanship" (which is 'highly recommended' and 'best practice' ...a benchmark of safe aircraft operations).

(a) Large Aerploanes (> 5,700kg MTOM) are obliged to comply with AFM performance
(b) Aircraft defined in the "Private" category can include a Boeing 737 or larger aircraft.

  
Any type of aircraft planning to use Ashcroft must be below 5,700kg MTOM and operate in a non-commercial category to comply with ICAO international aviation regulations.
  
Aircraft (between 1,200kg - 5,700kg MTOM) not using Ashcroft on the normal (telephone / email) PPR basis are assessed as 'high risk' to the general public using our road,  (unless 'common sense aircraft  performance planning' is observed)

In an attempt to adapt to the latest CAA policies regarding GA risk-based regulation, we will continue to assess risks to the uninvolved general public iaw recent CAA guidlines.

This offers a measure of protection to the general public exercising their lawful right to use our public road on our Eastern Airfield boundary and minimises any liabity issues by pilots not complying with UK & International Aviation Laws. 



4. Fly over our road 50ft minimum to comply with Rule 5(3)a

Since our road is used by the general public, appropriate aircraft performance calculations (iaw the most recent performance data) are legally required to clear this road by at least 50ft iaw ANO Rule 5(3.a) ... pertinent to Unlicensed Airfields

 
SSL 078(c) "You should always ensure that after applying all the relevant factors .... the Landing Distance Required (LDR) from a height of 50 feet does not exceed landing Distance Available"
   
In our experience, most pilots act in a responsible manner and adhere to the relevant CAA safety policy documents regarding aircraft performance and Rule 5





 
5. Civil Aviation Authority (UK)
CAA regulatory review of GA"for securing the safety of air navigation and the safety of aircraft and of persons and property carried therein, [and] for preventing aircraft endangering other persons and property". The UK Rules of the Air Regulations are enabled under the ANO"
  
Ashcroft Airfield: attempting to secure the safety of aircraft & persons carried therein [and] preventing aircraft endangering other persons & property

6. Civil Aviation Authority (UK) 
    
QUOTE ....Accidents such as failure to get airborne, collision with obstacles after take-off and over-run on landing occur frequently to light aeroplanes. Many have happened at short licensed runways, as well as strips, often when operating out of wind or where there was a slope. Poor surfaces, such as long or wet grass, mud or snow, were often contributory factors. Many, if not all, of these performance accidents could have been avoided if the pilots had been fully aware of the performance limitations of their aeroplanes. The pilot in command has a legal obligation under EU Part-NCO and Article 87 of the Air Navigation Order 2009, which require the pilot to check that the aeroplane will have adequate performance for the proposed flight .. UNQUOTE



7. Civil Aviation Authority (UK) 
  
QUOTE .... Unlicensed aerodromes and private strips are often used by pilots and private owners. They may be more convenient or cheaper than licensed aerodromes; however, they do require special consideration. Approximately one third of GA Reportable Accidents in the UK occur during take-off or landing at unlicensed aerodromes .. UNQUOTE

   
8. See and Avoid ... Peripheral and ... Tunnel vision
   
Caution: Regarding limitations of the "See-and-Avoid" Principle. Peripheral vision is reduced under conditions of high workload.

      
"A number of researchers have shown that peripheral stimuli are more difficult to detect when attention is focussed on a central task"

Safety Sense Leaflet 13: Collision Avoidance

"Another inherent eye problem is the narrow field of vision. Although our eyes accept light rays from an arc of nearly 200°, they are limited to a relatively narrow area (approximately 10–15°) in which they can actually focus on and classify an object. Although movement on the periphery can be perceived, we cannot identify what is happening there, and we tend not to believe what we see out of the corner of our eyes. This, aided by the brain, often leads to 'tunnel vision'.
  
http://www.rapp.org/archives/2013/08/see-and-avoid/
  
"The pilot’s functional visual field contracts under conditions of stress or increased workload.
The resulting ‘tunnel vision’ reduces the chance that an approaching aircraft will be seen in peripheral vision"

   



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